Monday, March 28, 2011

LeMaster Families, 1941 Portland, Indiana Directory

Source: Portland, Indiana Con-Survey Directory, 1941 (Parsons, Kansas: Baldwin and Sun), page 147

This is a scan of a page from the 1941 directory of Portland, Jay County, Indiana that contained listings of the LeMaster family.  I retrieved this on my last visit to the Jay County Public Library.

Le Master Arth (Maude) h 624 N Meridian 
Le Master John L Co Aud res Ft Recovery Ohio RD 3
Le Master Nadine mach opr Jay Garment Co h 3 Bryson Apts
Le Master Ord W (Ruth) 3 prs mn Sheller Mfg Corp r 507 E Walnut

My grandfather, Ord, was working for Sheller Manufacturing Corporation, or Sheller-Globe.  The household had 3 children at the time.



View Larger Map

Grandpa's brother, John, was County Auditor, and I thought it was odd that his mailing address was listed as Ohio.  Then my dad told me that folks who lived out in the Salamonia area had a rural delivery mailing address of nearby Fort Recovery, Ohio. Interesting.  

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Black Sheep Sunday: South Side Bank Robbery, Kokomo, Indiana (1925)

Warsaw Daily Times, May 6, 1925, page 1.



HARRY PIERPONT TURNS STATE EVIDENCE IN HIS TRIAL FOR BANK ROBBERY


(Special by United Press)


Kokomo, Ind., May 6. - The defense sprang a surprise in the trial Wednesday of Harry Pierpont, Indianapolis, charged with robbing the South Side Bank here.  Pierpont took the stand and admitted practically all of the evidence contained in a confession made by Thaddeus Skeer, of Fort Wayne, who was arrested with him after the robbery.  Pierpont told of entering and holding up the bank and fleeing to Fort Wayne, where he said the loot was divided between himself and three others.  He said that the robbery was planned by Skeer.


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Cousin Harry PIERPONT (1902-1934) was sentenced to 10 to 21 years for the robbery of the South Side State Bank in Kokomo, Indiana.


Black Sheep Sunday – create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.” Bring out your ne’er-do-wells, your cads, your black widows, your horse thieves and tell their stories. And don’t forget to check out the International Black Sheep Society of Genealogists (IBSSG). This is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Sunday's Obituary: Elvin Cooper LeMaster (1912-2000)

Source: Commercial-Review, Portland, Indiana, May 17, 2000, page 12

Elvin C. LeMaster, 87, Columbus, Ohio, a native of Jay County, died Tuesday at Kobacker House in Columbus.

He was retired from Commercial Motor Freight of Indiana.

LeMaster was a member of the Maynard Avenue United Methodist Church, Ralplh Rickey Lodge No. 670 F&AM, Scottish Rite Valley of Columbus, and Aladdin Temple Shrine.

Surviving are his wife, Cleo; four daughters, Mrs. Max (Phyllis) Stewart, New Albany, Nancy Cooper, Columbus, Mr. Bill (Linda) Nelson, Antioch, Calif., and Mrs. Calvin (Sharol) Kelly, Columbus; one sister, Mary O. Taylor, Edgewater, Fla.; 21 grandchildren; and 28 great-grandchildren.

Services are set for 11 a.m. (Ohio time) Friday at the Southwick-Good Funeral Chapel, Columbus, with Rev. Glenn Schwerdtfeger and Rev. Bruce Beavers officiating.  Burial will be in Forest Lawn Memorial Park.

Friends may call at the funeral home from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday and one hour prior to services Friday.



Sunday’s Obituary – if you have obituaries of family members and ancestors, consider posting them along with other information about that person as part of Sunday’s Obituary. This is an ongoing series developed by Leslie Ann at Ancestors Live Here.

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Surname Saturday : ALDERMAN

The ALDERMAN surname is in my maternal line.  The origins of the surname are not yet known.


Stories and history:


Ahnentafel # 55: Jane Ann Alderman (1843-1919). Jane was born in 1843 in Indiana or Illinois, the 1850 and 1860 census disagree.  She married circa 1868, probably Madison County, Indiana to John Penisten (c1839-1908).  John was born circa 1839 in Indiana.  They had at least 2 children and lived in Fall Creek and Richland Townships, Madison County, Indiana.  John died March 10, 1908 in Madison County, Indiana.  Jane died April 8, 1919 in Alexandria, Madison County, Indiana.  Both are buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery, Alexandria, Madison County, Indiana.


Ahnentafel # 110: Richard Alderman (1810-aft1870).  Richard was born in 1810 in Kentucky.  He married circa 1840 in Indiana to Eliza ________ (c1825-     ).  Eliza was born circa 1825 in Virginia, last living in 1850 census in Madison County, Indiana.  They raised 7 children in Anderson, Madison County, Indiana where Richard was a dairyman and farmer.  Richard last appears in the 1870 census of Madison County, Indiana, living in Richland Township.


Ahnentafel # 220: James Alderman (bef1775-bet1850/4).  James was born before 1775 in Virginia.  He married June 8, 1795 in Augusta County, Virginia to Catherine Warner (1777-1859).  Catherine was born January 1777 in Virginia.  They had 3 children.  They divorced, and Catherine remarried to John Luark/Lewark.  Catherine died September 17, 1859 in Madison County, Indiana.  James married secondly after 1800 to Martha Cantell (bef1775-    ).  Martha is my line.  Martha and James had 8 children.  James died between 1850 and 1854 in Greenville, Bond County, Illinois.


Ahnentafel # 440: Richard Alderman.  Nothing further known at this time.


Related blog posts:




Surname Saturday – create a post in which you discuss a surname and mention its origins, its geographical location(s) and how it fits into your genealogy research. Surname Saturday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Friday, March 25, 2011

Photo: Geneva Ruth (Aldridge) Pierce


This photo of Geneva Ruth (ALDRIDGE) PIERCE comes from the 1985 directory of the First United Methodist Church in Alexandria, Madison County, Indiana.


Geneva was the widow of my maternal great granduncle, William McClellan PIERCE (1913-1978).  She was born February 18, 1914 in Goldsmith, Indiana and died April 23, 1996 in Anderson, Madison County, Indiana.  Geneva was the daughter of Fred Curtis and Minerva (JARRETT) ALDRIDGE.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Keeping Up With The Joneses

I really did have good intentions of keeping up-to-date with the Fearless Female meme from Lisa Alzo’s The Accidental Genealogist blog.  I thought the prompts were thought-provoking and like many family historians, the females tend to receive a short shift in my family.  I started out well, but it didn’t take long to fall off the pace.

I understand that these prompts are just suggestions, and there is no requirement to do them all, but I feel overwhelmed because I didn’t keep up. It’s not that I didn’t have ancestor stories to go with the prompts, I just had so much else going on that I wasn’t able to complete them.

In fact, other than a few post-dated blog posts that have appeared or are scheduled to soon post, I haven’t written much in the way of posts.  My goal has been to have something posted everyday, whether it’s only a photo or a day-of-the-week meme such as Tombstone Tuesday.  Right now, I’ve fallen down on the job, in my estimation.

Everyone who blogs on their family history does it a little bit differently and sets their own pace.  That’s one of the benefits of blogging – it’s your blog.  Yet why do I feel that I’m not keeping up with everyone else?

What is it about my personality that makes me feel lazy if I’m not busy?  I’ve a full plate at work, just jumped into local politics, and am trying to start a business on the side and I’m feeling as if I’m underperforming because I haven’t written my daily blog posts.

I have plenty of material on hand for some posts, including recently acquired articles on my blacksheep relative Harry Pierpont, estate records on Eileen’s family, military records of my grandfather, etc.  It’s just finding the time to write them down right now has me feeling a bit overwhelmed.

I’ll probably just rant a bit and then go back to my old ways – posting as much as possible with post-dated blog posts and hopefully will have something nearly every day.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: William Clifford LeMaster (1871-1922)


Source: Evergreen Cemetery (Colorado Springs, Colorado), W.C. LeMaster marker, photographed by Nick Hardy, 23 January 2011.

William Clifford LeMASTER, son of Luman Walker and Mary Keziah (CHEW) LEMASTERS, is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery, Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Random Act of Genealogical Kindness volunteer, Nick Hardy, provided these photos for me.

Though the marker states his birth was 1870, all other indications show his birth as September 1, 1871 in Darke County, Ohio.  He married Lella Edith LEWIS on August 20, 1892 Jay County, Indiana and they had 4 children.  William died July 26, 1922 in Sedalia, Douglas County, Colorado.


Tombstone Tuesday – To participate in Tombstone Tuesday simply create a post which includes an image of a gravestone of one or more ancestors and it may also include a brief description of the image or the ancestor. This is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Sunday's Obituary : Garth L. LeMaster (1921-1998)

Source: Commercial-Review, Portland, Indiana, February 6, 1998, page 10.

Garth L. LeMaster, Sr., 76, 229 W. McNeil St., Portland, died Thursday at Jay County Hospital.


He retired in 1983 from Teledyne Portland Forge and was active in the Boy Scouts for many years.


An Army veteran of World War II, he attended the Portland Friends Church.


Born April 6, 1921, in Jay County, he was the son of Clarence and Mae (Bickel) LeMaster.  He was married May 9, 1942, to Ora Lee Brady, who survives.


Surviving besides his wife are three sons, Garth L. "Mike" LeMaster, James "David" LeMaster, both of Portland, and Pat LeMaster, Pennville; one daughter, Martha "LeeAnn" Morrical, Indianapolis; one brother, Kenneth LeMaster, Portland; two sisters, Mary Hummel and Jean Coby, both of Union City; nine grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.


Services are set for 1 p.m. Monday in the Baird-Freeman Funeral Home, Portland, with the Rev. Jerry Vincent officating.  Burial will be in the Salamonia Cemetery.  Calling will be at the funeral home from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.


Memorials may be made to Boy Scouts, Gideons, or the charity of the donor's choice.


Sunday’s Obituary – if you have obituaries of family members and ancestors, consider posting them along with other information about that person as part of Sunday’s Obituary. This is an ongoing series developed by Leslie Ann at Ancestors Live Here.

Black Sheep Sunday: A Family Business?

Logansport Pharos Tribune, April 21, 1925, page 1
LINK PRISONER WITH KOKOMO SUSPECT

Brazil, Ind., April 21 - Fred Pierpont, 22, was held in the Clay county jail today in connection with a bank robbery near Wabash, Ind., several weeks ago.  Detectives plan to grill Pierpont today in an effort to learn if he is a brother of Harry Pierpont, held for the robbery of the South Kokomo bank.  Fred was arrested at his home last night.

---
Cousin Harry PIERPONT's younger brother, Fred, was also picked up by the police.  In reading on the activities of Harry and other Dillinger associates, Fred was often arrested in an attempt to get him to talk.  How involved he was in the criminal acts, I do not yet know, but I'm having fun trying to find out.  I'm looking forward to reading more old newspaper articles - and eventually will have to visit the local libraries and courthouses to see what other records I can dig out.


Logansport Pharos Tribune, May 2, 1925, page 1.

KOKOMO BANDIT SUSPECT RELEASED


Kokomo, Ind., May 2 - Fred Pierpont, 18, of Brazil, Ind., was free today following his acquital by a jury in circuit court here on charges of aiding his brother, Harry Pierpont, alleged bank bandit, to esapce from the Howard county jail.


Harry Pierpont was arrested in Detroit in early April for alleged participation in the robbery of the South Kokomo bank last March.



Black Sheep Sunday – create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.” Bring out your ne’er-do-wells, your cads, your black widows, your horse thieves and tell their stories. And don’t forget to check out the International Black Sheep Society of Genealogists (IBSSG). This is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Surname Saturday : PENISTEN

The PENISTEN surname is in my maternal line.  Variations include PENNISTEN, PENISTON, etc.  The origins of the surname are unknown.


Ahnentafel # 27: Clara Penisten (1869-1906).  Clara was born March 1869 in Madison County, Indiana.  She married January 14, 1892 in Madison County, Indiana to William Francis Pierce (1865-1950).  William was born July 10, 1865 in Frankton, Madison County, Indiana.  They were the parents of 7 children, only 3 of whom survived.  William died September 21, 1950 in Alexandria, Madison County, Indiana.  Clara died September 26, 1906 in Lafayette Township, Madison County, Indiana.  Both are buried in the Maplewood Cemetery, Anderson, Madison County, Indiana.


Ahnentafel # 54: John Penisten (c1839-1908). John was born circa 1839 in Indiana, probably in Madison County.  He married circa 1868 to Jane Ann Alderman (1843-1919).  Jane was born 1843 in Indiana.  They had 2 children.  Jane died April 8, 1919 in Alexandria, Madison County, Indiana.  John died March 10, 1908 in Madison County, Indiana.  Both are buried in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Alexandria, Madison County, Indiana.


Ahnentafel # 108: George Washington Penisten (1813-     ).  George was born 1813 in Pike County, Ohio. He married Sarah Mustard (c1816-     ).  They came to Madison County, Indiana in the late 1830s and were the parents of 5 children in Richland Township, Madison County, Indiana.  The last census record I have for George is in 1850, the last for Sarah is in 1870.  I do not yet know when and where they died.


Ahnentafel # 216: Isaac Penisten (c1762-     ).  Isaac was born circa 1762 in New Jersey.  He married Sarah Elizabeth ________ (c1773-     ).  Sarah was born circa 1773 in Pennsylvania.  They were the parents of 5 children.  Nothing further is known at this time.  


Ahnentafel # 432: George Penisten (c1740-     ). George married Mary McCully (c1740-     ).  Mary was born circa 1740 in New Jersey.  They were the parents of at least 2 children.  Nothing further is known at this time.


Related blog posts:




Surname Saturday – create a post in which you discuss a surname and mention its origins, its geographical location(s) and how it fits into your genealogy research. Surname Saturday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Photo: Orville, Lola and Nancy Wright


This undated photo of Orville Charles and Lola Wilson (MILLER) WRIGHT, and youngest daughter Nancy, comes from an undated directory of the First United Methodist Church in Alexandria, Madison County, Indiana.


Orville was the son of Fred Albert and Cleo Marie (DORTON) WRIGHT, born November 30, 1918 in Alexandria.  He died July 3, 1986 in Alexandria.  Lola was the daughter of George Menees and Linne Ethel (WILSON) MILLER.

Friday, March 18, 2011

Photo: Fred & Cleo Wright


This photo of Fred Albert and Cleo Marie (DORTON) WRIGHT comes from an undated directory of the First United Methodist Church, Alexandria, Madison County, Indiana.  

Fred was the first cousin of my maternal great-grandfather.  He was the son of Charles and Bertha (LEONARD) WRIGHT.  Born February 3, 1893 in Alexandria, he died September 14, 1985 in Alexandria.  Cleo was the daughter of John and Rosetta (DUNN) DORTON.  She was born February 13, 1895 in Matthews, Grant County, Indiana and died April 6, 1994 in Alexandria.

Research Trip : Howard and Wabash Counties, Indiana


Spent yesterday doing a bit of research and ended up having an enjoyable day and some success.  It was a beautiful day, almost a shame to be inside at the library and courthouse.


My first stop was Kokomo to see what I could find out about Harry Pierpont and the 1925 bank robbery there.  I wanted to see what records the circuit court might have.  I could not find a parking spot at the courthouse, so ended up parking at the Kokomo-Howard County Public Library, just a few blocks away.  It was a good thing that I did.


My research wasn't totally focused on PIERPONT, I did manage to find my maternal 2nd-great grandfather, Charles LAMBERTSON, listed in the 1939 Farmer's Directory of Howard County as well - a source that I'd not previously located.


The library has a very extensive local history and genealogy section, including a large amount of vertical files.  Included in these vertical files was one for Harry Pierpont, as well as one for Pearl Elliott.  I quickly made photocopies of the articles and letters that had been included in the files.  It was interesting to note other researchers had written to the library in the past, including author Ellen Poulsen, author of Don't Call Us Molls:Women of the John Dillinger Gang.


The articles I copied from the vertical files were from the Kokomo Dispatch, a  local paper not found on Ancestry.com.  Armed with this information, I headed over to the courthouse, where I assumed that I would find much more information.


Every courthouse is different, but I've been used to being able to walk into the clerk's office, ask a where certain 'big books' are located, and be left alone to wander through them.  Maybe that has spoiled me.  Not so in Howard County.  However, the clerk there was very helpful, and we struck up a conversation about the wild nature of the city in the 1920s and 1930s, once she found out what I was looking for.  She found the criminal books and came back to tell me that she couldn't find anything on Harry, which seemed strange.


Then, looking at the article in the Dispatch, it noted that he was in city court.  Now why he would have been in city court, which is normally for misdemeanors instead of a circuit court, neither of us could figure out. She told me that Harry's name was familiar, as if she had been looking for him before for someone else.  When I mentioned John Dillinger her eyes lit up. The strange thing was, the criminal book she had included records from multiple judges during that time period, almost as if there might be a missing book.  Intrigued, she offered to do some more searching for me, and I left the details of the case along with my business card.  So glad that I carry them from work - they make a good contact point.


The county clerk suggested that if records from the city court existed, they may be located with the city building.  After a false start at the Kokomo Police Department, I was directed over to the Kokomo city clerk, who was able to find where the records were located.  Problem was, they were microfilmed on 8mm, and they didn't have a reader in that office.  After checking with the city attorney - to see if it was o.k. if I could see the records, she also took down information about the case and my contact information and offered to do some checking.


So, even though I know the disposition of the case, I remain curious to the particulars.  Not sure what records, if any, might be turned up by the court.  Had I not stopped by the library first, I would have probably gone away disappointed at the county clerk's office, thinking that the records were destroyed.  Hopefully, the clerk's will be able to find something.


My next stop was Greentown, where I hoped that their Historical Society was open.  Unfortunately, it was closed, so I headed to their small public library.  I had wanted to visit it for years, thinking that it might have some information on the LAMBERTSON and BEALS families who lived in the area.  Finally able to visit, I was disappointed to find out it was a bust.  The library is so small it is attached to Eastern Howard High School.  Their "local history" section was in a back room, which was being used for storage and I had to fight stacks of shipping boxes to get into the file cabinet that had some vertical files.  Finding nothing there of interest, I did manage to look through the yearbooks from the time period, but didn't find any mention of my grandmother's family.  


After a quick lunch, I headed up to Wabash, Indiana to do some research on Eileen's family, particularly the PEFLEY line.  Their research room allowed me to roam around, and I found several records of interest, including some estate and guardianship records.  Locating them on microfiche for me, I was able to print off an extensive file on Sarah May (PEEPLES) PEFLEY, as well as Albert Duffey PEFLEY. The files offered a fascinating glimpse into the family dynamics, as the husband was seeking guardianship over his wife, who had been declared to have been of "unsound mind".  My only disappointment was that at $1.00/page, I didn't have enough funds to copy all of the files I located for other family members.  Sometimes it's hard to pick and choose what records to focus on.  So, I will have to make a return trip to Wabash County in the future.


All in all, not a bad research trip, and now I have more fodder for future posts...

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Those Places Thursday : Top Hat Drive In, Alexandria Indiana

Mom shared her memories of an old Alexandria, Indiana landmark and a photo from her high school yearbook.


Source: Alexandria-Monroe High School Spectrum, 1964 edition



Top Hat Special

When I was in high school I worked as a carhop and payroll clerk for the Top Hat Drive-In.   Our special was the "Top Hat" Sandwich which was nothing more than a cheeseburger on toast with lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise.   It was amazing how good a cheeseburger could be just by changing to toast and proved to be a popular item for customers.  If I recall they sold for 35 cents. 

Our other specials include hand-bread tenderloins and onion rings which were double dipped in a milk&egg mixture and then into cracker crumbs.   I remember "tater tots" being introduced and were served with sour cream.   

The Top Hat was owned locally by insurance man, Neal Johnson, teacher & coach, Shorty Burdsall, and Harry Jolliff.   Harry was the one who mainly managed and worked the grill.   Shorty would on occasion work the grill when Harry had to be off.




Those Places Thursday – do you often think back to places where you lived and worked at one time? What about those places where your ancestors spent time? Post about “those places” with photos and stories on Those Places Thursday. This has been an ongoing series by Cheryl Palmer of Heritage Happens.

Erin Go Bragh


Miss Vera Haley
Portland, Ind.
"Route 9"

Come and visit us.  This is a little remembrance.  My address is Mrs. __ __ 401 Franklin St. Lorain Ohio.

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This postcard, postmarked March 15, 1909 in Lorain, Ohio was sent to my paternal great aunt, Vera HALEY.  The sender's name looks like Mrs. Chris Coder, but I'm not sure.  Any suggestions from readers is appreciated.

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Update 3/18/11:  Thanks to reader comments, I checked Ancestry.com for the name Ohio Coder in Lorain, Ohio.  There was an Ohio Coder in city directories and census records in the 2nd war. In 1910, it was indexed as Colter, but in other records it was definitely Coder.  Mrs. Coder's first name was Della.  I know of no relationship to Vera Haley at this time.

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Photo: Ruby and Bob Walsh

Ruby and Bob Walsh
Ruby and Bob Walsh
Ruby and Bob Walsh
Bob Walsh
These photos from the collection of cousin Mike Walsh, show his parents, Robert and Ruby (LAMBERTSON) WALSH during the World War II years.  Most of the photos were not marked with locations, but I believe they were taken either in Florida or Texas.


Ruby Walsh, San Antonio, TX 1944
This photo was labeled as being taken in 1944 in San Antonio, TX.  Notice that the house is the same as the photo of uncle Bob above, so we can place that one in 1944 in San Antonio as well.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: James Louis Pierce (1931-2002)

Source: Maplewood Cemetery (Anderson, Madison County, Indiana), James Pierce marker, photographed by Travis LeMaster, 23 June 2009.

James Louis PIERCE is buried in the Maplewood Cemetery, Anderson, Madison County, Indiana.  James is my maternal great granduncle.

James was born September 10, 1931 in Madison County, Indiana, the son of William Francis and Vida (MADDOX) PIERCE.

James was a Korean War veteran.

James died January 19, 2002.  I do not know where he died.

Tombstone Tuesday – To participate in Tombstone Tuesday simply create a post which includes an image of a gravestone of one or more ancestors and it may also include a brief description of the image or the ancestor. This is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Photo: Terry Wright On Sax

(L-R): Pearl Lambertson, William Wright, Terry Wright, Charles Lambertson, Jack Lambertson


This is a photo from the collection of my cousin Mike Walsh showing my maternal uncle, Terry WRIGHT, playing the saxophone for assembled relatives. This photo was taken at the home of Charles and Pearl (BEALS) LAMBERTSON.

In the photo from left to right are: Pearl (BEALS) LAMBERTSON, William Lee WRIGHT, Terry WRIGHT, Charles LAMBERTSON, Orville "Jack" LAMBERTSON.

Monday, March 14, 2011

Photo: Lambertson and Beals

Cora Beals, Pearl Lambertson, Charles Lambertson
The backside of this photograph says "Mom & Dad and Cora Beals".  Charles and Pearl (BEALS) LAMBERTSON were my 2nd-great grandparents.  I do not know who Cora BEALS was.  This photo was part of the collection of my cousin Mike Walsh.


There was a Dora Beals, wife of John Franklin Beals - who was Pearl's aunt.  I'm wondering if that is who this picture actually is.  This Dora was born 1871. Pearl was born in 1878 and Charles in 1872.  If I had to lay money on it, I think that this photo was mislabeled.





LeMaster Families, 1949 Portland, Indiana Directory Listings


Portland Indiana Con-Survey City Directory, 1949. Columbus, Ohio: The Mullin-Kille & Son Publishing Co., Inc., 1949

This is a scan of the page from the 1949 directory of Portland, Jay County, Indiana that contained listings of the LeMASTER family.  I retrieved this on my last visit to the Jay County Public Library.

LeMaster Chesley F (Clara L) carp Chas L Sanders & Son h 609 W High
LeMaster Dale W (Grace C) 1 bodymn Minch Body Co h 609 1/2 W High
LeMaster Donald C (Luella M) 3 h 1100 W Arch
LeMaster Garth L (Ora L) 2 clk Kroger Co h 234 W Votaw
LeMaster Mary M opr United Tel Co r 716 W Arch
LeMaster Ord W (Ruth P) 4 fcty h 1107 W Water

This is the earliest directory listing I've found so far with my grandparents, Ord and Ruth LeMASTER, living in the house on Water Street in Portland.


Sunday, March 13, 2011

Sunday's Obituary : Bertha A. Hercules (1892-1962)

Source: Commercial-Review, Portland, Indiana, January 2, 1962, page 1.

SALAMONIA NATIVE DIES


Mrs. Bertha A. Hercules, 69, died Saturday night at her home in Richmond, apparently as the result of a heart attack.


Mrs. Hercules was the daughter of Luman and Barbara LeMaster, Salamonia.  In addition to her immediate family, she is survived by three sisters and seven brothers including five who live in the area.  They are Ord W. LeMaster, Portland; Clarence H., Gerald W., and John L. LeMaster, all of Salamonia; and Floyd LeMaster, Union City.


Immediate survivors are the husband, Russell J. Hercules, who with his wife owned and operated Hercules Builders Supplies, Richmond; also a daughter, Mrs. William Spears, Eaton, and a son, Murvel, Williamsburg.


Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Jones and [?]lacke Funeral Home, Richmond.  Burial will be in Salamonia.  Friends may call at the funeral home after 2 p.m. today.


Sunday’s Obituary – if you have obituaries of family members and ancestors, consider posting them along with other information about that person as part of Sunday’s Obituary. This is an ongoing series developed by Leslie Ann at Ancestors Live Here.

Black Sheep Sunday: Men Held In Detroit For Kokomo Theft





Source: Pharos Tribune, Logansport, Indiana, April 2, 1925, page 10.


MEN HELD IN DETROIT FOR KOKOMO THEFT


Two Alleged Bandits and Sweetheart of Another Seized at Apartment


PART OF LOOT RECOVERED


Revolvers and Guns Found in Search of Apartment - $ 850 Found


Detroit, Mich., April 2 - Two alleged bank bandits and the sweetheart of one were held by police today after being trapped in an appartment.


The two men are alleged to have held up the Kokomo, Ind., State bank last week and escaped with $9,400.  Part of the loot was found in the apartment.


Those held are Frank Mason, alias Harry; Thaddeus R. Skeer, and Louise Brummer.  Louise is said to be the sweetheart of Skeer.  She came here from Fort Wayne, Ind., Saturday.


Revolvers and guns were found under pillows, in the closets and drawers of the bureaus.   Mason was found to have $850 in new $100 and $50 bills and the Brummer girls had a number of valuable diamond rings and other jewelry.


---
Another article about the 1925 Kokomo bank robbery that sent distant cousin, Harry PIERPONT (1902-1934) to Michigan City State Prison.  Harry was using the name "Frank Mason" as an alias.

Photo: Wilbur Roscoe Decker

Wilbur Roscoe Decker

This photo is of Wilbur Roscoe DECKER, son of Peter W. and Pansy (GILLILAND) DECKER.  It was part of the collection of photos I was able to scan at Mike Walsh's.  Wilbur was a 1st cousin of my maternal grandmother, Bonnie LAMBERTSON.  The photographer's stamp is from Bloomington, Indiana.

The back side of the photograph is a postcard, not mailed but appears to be address to my maternal great uncle, Harold LAMBERTSON.


Left side: Wilbur Roscoe Decker.  Taken Jan. 12 20. Aged 2 years.  
Right side: Master Harold Wayne Lambertson

This photograph would have been taken on his second birthday.  Wilbur Roscoe DECKER was born January 12, 1918 in Springfield, Illinois. He married August 6, 1938 to Mary WEIR, and had at least one daughter, Sharon Sue.  Wilbur died  July 9, 1980.

Fearless Females: Moment of Strength

March 13 — Moment of Strength: share a story where a female ancestor showed courage or strength in a difficult situation.


I'm not sure which story to write about regarding courage or strength in a difficult situation, as there are many that come to mind.  My mother dealing with cancer.  My grandmother Bonnie losing her husband when he was 53.  My great-aunt Vera losing two babies.  My great-grandmother June being an orphan at 2. Everyone who survived the economic hardships of the Great Depression.  The list could go on and on.  For many, the concept of hardship was simply unknown, addressed as just "part of life".  Today we take so much for granted and we look back and wonder how they made it.  They made it because the alternative - to give up, was simply not an acceptable alternative.


As I look at my family history, I note that so many of the stories of the women in my family have been untold, and thus lost to history.  What bits and pieces I can cobble together are told from the perspective of the men in their lives through the lens of the social and economic history of the period.  I'm glad that I've been able to interview my mother and father recently about those relatives they knew, before another generation's tales are lost.


Once again, in honor of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Photo: Terry Wright On Horseback

Terry Wright on horse
This is a photo of my maternal uncle, Terry WRIGHT, seated on a horse at the Wright farm.  In the background you can just make out the head of his grandpa, Virgil WRIGHT.  The original is in the collection of Mike Walsh.

Fearless Females: Working Girl

March 12 — Working girl: Did your mother or grandmother work outside the home? What did she do? Describe her occupation.


While I remember my mother being at home with us for the most part, I do remember that she worked as a substitute teacher in the area.  Before I was born, mom was a elementary school teacher in Muncie, Indiana at Roosevelt Elementary. She obtained her undergraduate in elementary education and master's degree in library science from Ball State University. Once we were old enough to be in school, she tried to go back into the schools full time, but was having a hard time finding work. She was a substitute teacher at Orestes Elementary and Frankton schools, covering for maternity leaves. Eventually, a position opened as the children's librarian at the Alexandria-Monroe Township Public Library.  She worked there for a number of years before a position opened up as the head librarian at the Alexandria-Monroe High School.  She worked there until she retired.  She's still active on the local public library board, and volunteers at the school libraries as well.  Books are in her (and my) blood.


My grandmother Wright worked in a factory in the 1950s for a few years to earn money to buy a new refrigerator.  The story was that she went to work to buy a $500 refrigerator and left owing $5000 because they bought a new car.  Later, she worked for a few years at the junior high school in the cafeteria.  I just found this fact out last week, when I came across a photo of her from the school yearbook.


My grandmother LeMaster didn't work outside the home, though she was an Avon representative for many years.  I remember a couple of times when we stayed with her going out on delivery runs.


Once again, in honor of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month

Surname Saturday : GROENENDYKE

The GROENENDYKE surname is in my maternal line.  Variations include GROENDYKE, GRUENDYKE, etc.  The origins of the surname are Dutch.


Stories and history:


Ahnentafel # 53: Catherine Groenendyke (1843-1913).  Catherine was born February 4, 1843 in Madison County, Indiana.  She married May 5, 1864 in Madison County, Indiana to Edmund G. Pierce (1837-1875).  Edmund was born April 30, 1837 in Wayne County, Indiana.  They raised 5 children in Lafayette Township, Madison County, Indiana.  Edmund died January 8, 1875 in Madison County, Indiana.  Catherine died December 10, 1913 in Lafayette Township, Madison County, Indiana.


Ahnentafel # 106: Elias Groenendyke (1818-1906).  Elias was born May 20, 1818 in Fayette County, Indiana.  He married July 28, 1839 in Fayette County, Indiana to Nancy Jenkins (1817-1856).  Nancy was born in 1817 in North Carolina.  They had 9 children in Fayette and Madison Counties, Indiana.  Elias was a farmer and teacher. Nancy died May 11, 1856 in Madison County, Indiana.  Elias married secondly on October 21, 1857 to Hester Teaford (1827-1870).  Hester was born July 26, 1827 in Ohio.  They had 4 children, and moved the family to Darke County, Ohio.  Hester died September 23, 1870 in Darke County, Ohio.  Elias died May 23, 1906 in Darke County, Ohio.


Ahnentafel # 212: James Groenendyke (1770-1836). James was born in 1770 in Middlesex County, New Jersey.  He married June 4, 1797 to Joannah Antonides (1778-1825).  Joannah was born August 28, 1778 in New Jersey.  They had 8 children in Middlesex County, New Jersey and Dearborn and Fayette Counties, Indiana.  They moved to Indiana just after the War of 1812.  Joannah died in Fayette County, Indiana in 1825.  James married secondly on June 3, 1826 in Henry County, Indiana to Barbara Buck (1795-1878).  Barbara was born April 5, 1798 in Salem, North Carolina.  They had 7 children together. Barbara died September 17, 1878.  James died September 1836 in Fayette County, Indiana.


Ahnentafel # 424: Nicholas Groenendyke (1749-1808).  Nicholas was born March 20, 1749 in Kingston, Middlesex County, New Jersey. He had at least two wives, Violet Story and Catherine Kiple.  I do not know which was the mother of James, and this is the weakest link in the family line.  Nicholas died in February 1808.


Ahnentafel # 848: Johannes Groenendyke (1718-1785).  Johannes was born 1718 in Kingston, Middlesex County, New Jersey.  He married August 25, 1744, probably in Middlesex County, New Jersey, to Sarah Ann Lake (c1725-1771).  Sarah was born circa 1725 in Middlesex County, New Jersey.  They had 10 children in Kingston, Middlesex County, New Jersey.  Sarah died May 1771.  Johannes died July 1785 near Kingston, Middlesex County, New Jersey.


Ahnentafel # 1696: Petrus "Samuel" Groenendyke (bef1685-1753).  Petrus was baptised August 16, 1685 at the Reformed Dutch Church of New Amsterdam.  He married October 24, 1713 at Flatbush Reformed Dutch Church to Sara Probasco (c1693-1713/14).  Sara was born circa 1693 and died between 1713 and 1714.  Petrus married secondly circa 1715 to Mayke Verkerk (c1688-    ).  Mayke was born circa 1688 in New Utrecht, Kings County, New York.  They had 7 children.  Petrus married thirdly on May 13, 1732 on May 13, 1732 at the Reformed Dutch Church in New York City to Maria Van Vleck (c1685-1759).  They had one daughter.  Maria died December 175
9. Petrus died November 23, 1753 in Flatbush, Long Island, New York.


Ahnentafel # 3392: Pieter Groenendyke alias Peter Smith (c1645-1701).  Pieter was born circa 1645 in Holland. He was a character.  He was sued by two women for fathering children at the same time, Annetje Blanck and Marritie de La Noy.  He married Marritie circa 1673 and they had 6 children together.  He was in Sussex County, Delaware by 1671, when he appears on the taxlist, by 1680 he was in Kent County.  He was elected in 1685 to the Delaware Assembly from Kent County and re-elected in 1689.  He died 1701 in Kent County, Delaware.


Related blog posts:




Surname Saturday – create a post in which you discuss a surname and mention its origins, its geographical location(s) and how it fits into your genealogy research. Surname Saturday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.